Live to Shoot - Defending our 2nd Amendment Rights

An Early Gun Confiscation Event

July 01, 2020 Jeff Dowdle Season 1 Episode 27
Live to Shoot - Defending our 2nd Amendment Rights
An Early Gun Confiscation Event
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Live to Shoot - Defending our 2nd Amendment Rights
An Early Gun Confiscation Event
Jul 01, 2020 Season 1 Episode 27
Jeff Dowdle

In this episode, we talk about one of the first official federally initiated gun confiscation events.

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Show Notes Transcript

In this episode, we talk about one of the first official federally initiated gun confiscation events.

Join me on Parler Social Media! https://par.pw/download/
@jefftdowdle
email me at jefftdowdle@gmail.com
Youtube Channel
subscribe to my newsletter
Check out our new apparel 

Well, welcome to the live to shoot podcast on Jeff Tuttle. And I've been a licensed firearm dealer for 13 years, and I'm passionate about supporting our second men rights. And this podcast will cover various topics related to the second minute amendment plus any other topics of the day, some stories of the history as well. And anything else that might be relevant. I also might flip in us story or movie story occasionally. And I hope that you find this, the following and you can take it away at least a little nugget each week. That something that you didn't know. So I'm a little behind in getting to this episode because I'm in the middle of my, Summer baseball world tour. Last weekend, I was in Longview and Tyler, Texas, and this upcoming weekend. we'll be in Marshall, Texas, and surrounding areas. And for you to all that, aren't familiar with Texas. That's out in the Piney woods of Texas, East, Texas, which is a, it's a beautiful area of the state. And, I love it out there. The trees are tall, big and tall, but, I am going to be spending the next few weekends in, in. Hotel rooms. So there were a lot of things that we could talk about this. In this episode, for example, that's another decision by the Supreme court where John Roberts again showed his liberal colors. Or continue my cancel culture rant since now, John Wayne airport is being moved or being renamed because, John Wayne is some previous comments he's made. Or how the media keeps trying to scare us, that the spike in COVID is still terrible. But when you look at it, the deaths are actually gone down and so on and so on and so on. But I thought I'd go back into history and talk about an early gun confiscation incident in the U S. I'm a previous episode when I was ranting about the cancel culture and the slippery slope that has been on. I also referenced how those second amendment supporters have been criticized for pushing back on reasonable gun control laws, because they were. what we refer to as a slippery slope. And by that, I mean, the bar keeps getting lower. for example, you know what, he needed 30 round magazine. You can just use a 10 round mailing and etc and etc. And that the left has always said that, The things that we, we talk about and are, afraid of happening that they would never happen. But what if I told you that there was an incident in the government did an organized gun confiscation. And it didn't end well. So let's go back in the early 18 hundreds. When the government was systematically, pushing, native Americans from their land into quote unquote Indian territories. It started during the Creek and Indian war warmer and soldiers took about 20 million acres from away from the Creek. Then Andrew Jackson, the Democrats, or to them. A a. The Indian removal in even signed an Indian removal act. It was considered as a form of, of systematic genocide against native Americans. The Plains Indians woman as impacted as the Creek until the push to move West. Later in the century attempt at a piece, the Fort Laramie treaty of 1851 was signed and the grant of the Plains Indians. 50 million acres in 1868, when another Democrat came in office, the treaty was revised or reduced it to about 60 acres. Side note. It's an, it always interesting how, and when we load all looking at our minority cultures, how many of the negative things that have been done to impact them, either native Americans or. are blacks that they were done by the Democrats, but, but I digress. So as time went on, the native Americans were pushed into smaller and smaller territories and those territories ended up not having enough game and wildlife too. To support there. There are people. So the native Americans were encouraged to start developing farms. And so that became somewhat of an agricultural community as well. But, Things. Gone bad. The Sue people for example, were starving and there was a flu epidemic. And then there was a drought in 89 destroying a whole season of crops. So as. What happens when people are in a dire Strait, they turn to their faith. And the SU, turned to a dance. It was called the ghost dance. And it started to spread to the Sioux nation. And this was a dance that was a spiritual ritual and supposed to be calling on the, coming up, their Messiah. It wasn't a war dance. But for those people that, Oh, I'm not familiar with it caused fear so one person requested the U S army the centuries because and i quote the indians are dancing in the snow and our wild grazing So the seventh calvary was sent and they ride the sioux nation around november november 20th. And then on december 15th, the calvary tried to arrest sitting bull because sitting bull wasn't stopping this go stance and also to remind you sitting bull Was the Sioux chief who had previously defeated the seventh Calvary at the battle of little big horn. custer's last stand During the attempt to arrest Sitting bull he was killed So after hearing about sitting bull's The Lakota in pine Ridge, they fled in the seventh Calvary starting to pursue them and intercepted them on December 28. Then on december 29th. The