Live to Shoot - Defending our 2nd Amendment Rights

Reflecting on America's Founding Fathers

July 08, 2023 Jeff Dowdle Episode 168
Live to Shoot - Defending our 2nd Amendment Rights
Reflecting on America's Founding Fathers
Live to Shoot - Defending our 2nd Amendment Rights
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Show Notes Transcript

In this episode we dive into the significance of Independence Day and discuss  our admiration for the courageous men who signed the Declaration of Independence. I  draws parallels between the challenges faced by the colonists and the issues of today, particularly discussing the Second Amendment and the need for individuals to stand up for their beliefs. Join Jeff as he pays tribute to the brave individuals who shaped America and encourages listeners to celebrate and protect the freedoms they fought for.
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Welcome to Live Cheat Podcast. My name is Jeff Dole and I've been licensed Firearm to live for the last 16 years. In this podcast, we talk about all things related to the Second Amendment, as well as anything that might be going in the other news or stories from my personal life or anything else that I might be interested in. So welcome, welcome, welcome. Today is July 8th. It's been a couple weeks since I've put a podcast out. Took a little break, took a little trip with my wife to Steamboat Springs Colorado. We stayed with some friends in their condo and just loved it. the temperatures were as high as a 75, low of 40, and at the same time here in Dallas it was hitting a hundred. So it was nice. We hiked. Just saw some great sites. It's a beautiful country in the, in the summer. Think I almost like it better than when there's snow on the ground. We did see some snow. We went up pine enough that there's still some snow there. They got a lot of snow over the winter. So the, the rivers are high, the creeks are high, they're flowing. There's bridges closed, things like that. But when we were out hiking, we went up to 11,000 square, 11 hike. You wanna say 11,000 feet on one hike and, That's one thing when I look out over this country and I think, more people need to get out and see this, it seems like this country is, is made up of a lot of people in these big cities, New York, Los Angeles San Francisco that never really see. What's going on in the middle of the country and the great vastness of this country and the uniqueness of it and how awesome it is. And what, what we are really fighting for and our founders fought for. And it's, just amazing is beautiful to see. And so, I just think that if. People got out and, and met more people in the middle of the country and understood what our perspectives were and saw what we're looking at. When you look out over vast acres of land with cows sprinkled on it and you start hearing how cows are bad for the world, and you're like, really? Look at those creatures. They've been feeding us for centuries and. just things like that, that's just so ridiculous and that the, climate's changing and destroying the world. I think you just need a different perspective than what's going on in, in these big cities. And I think cities are part of our problem. But anyway, enjoyed that time, you know, and then, Tuesday was Independence Day, the 4th of July, and I've said this before. It's one my. Favorite holidays? Just I am a big fan of the revolution, the revolutionary times what, how this country came to be, because not understanding that, you know, you can't understand what's going on today and why we have to fight so hard to maintain this, this great country and, and how it came to be. And. Celebrating that is very, very important. to me it's celebrating the birth and death of, of Christ and then celebrating the birth of this great country. And I hope we never are talking about the death of this country. But sometimes it feels like we're getting awful close. But when I look back at those men, That started the revolution on Independence Day, July 4th, 1776. I'm amazed at their courage that they had and we're gonna get back to the Second Amendment, and we'll touch on it. But, you, Supreme Court cases and Biden and all that baloney. Sometimes I feel like But when you go back to where it all began, I think sometimes important, important to reflect and put yourself in their shoes. They're there and they have, this wasn't their first choice and they, they, they've made a lot of attempts to. Rectify what they saw was some injustice from the king to get their own independence in, in a different way. But the finally push came to shove and they realized they had to just take up arms and, and, and fight for what they believed in. And, and that took great courage because, these men came from a lot of backgrounds. They all had a lot to lose. when you look at the, there's 56 men. Signed the declaration of of the Independence. two were brother or two were cousins, one was an orphan. Benjamin Franklin was the oldest at 70. The youngest was Thomas Lynch. He was 27. I think they averaged about 45. Was about the average age. They were merchants, businessmen, farmers, doctors, mo a lot were lawyers, judges. There was a governor Many had been in their own legislation. There's clergy. They were all, almost all were either Protestants and there was one Catholic Charles Carroll of Maryland. Seven, of the signers were educated. Harvard, Fort Yale, Fort William and Marion. Three at Princeton and Harvard and Yale, and Princeton. What they are today, they weren't this communist birthplace, they were formed by Christians. For Christians, when you look at the, what they all had to risk, and they knew that if they were captured and, and that they could hang, they were tre this, they were committing treason at this point in time. And think about today, who has that courage to really stand up? Because, we look at the, the power that the government has had and how they misused it to come down on what they consider. They're adversaries, their opponents, president Trump, people around him, Steve Bannon, Charlie Kirk, and the, like, that they, they've come on hard, you know, they, and, but you know, the, the signers LA at that time they weren't really facing anything much different that this king had a lot of, he was powerful. It was the British nation and. president Biden says, you know what, when he talks about AR fifteens and you, you need something bigger than an AR 15, you need an F 16 to, fight the United States government. Look at these colonists. They had muskets and they had a few cannons. The British Navy and the, the British army, the, the, the red coats, they were the finest fighting force. In the world at that point in time, we didn't have a navy of, of any kind. So you, you, the odds may seem to be stacked against you, but there was a reason why they fought to keep their arms. And that's what again, when the, you look at the way this thing started, the British were coming to ground up all their ammunition, gunpowder in their arms because they knew that they couldn't have this, an armed nation and keep them controlled. But so that, the, the times were different, but they weren't all that, they different as, as you think, and that, we need to find people of courage today. they had five of the signers were captured by the British during the, the war. 17. 17 fought in the American record relationship. American Revolutionary War. 11 of the signers had their homes and properties destroyed. 15. Participated in their state's constitutional convention, and six actually signed the Constitution. So we had 56 signed the Declaration of Independence. Six of those 56 signed the Constitution. I believe there was 14 that didn't see the end of the revolution. They signed the Declaration of Independence, but they died. 25% of the people that signed Declaration of Independence didn't even see. At the end of the Revolutionary War, they didn't see what they signed up for, but they knew that was a risk. These were great men and we can't forget how great they were. They put a lot at risk. There was a variety of, different types, but. They all had, one thing in common is they, they believed in these inial rights that we were so, that fought for, and that they had been pushed to the limit and it was time to stand up and fight. And I just think, that's the, what the beauty of the 4th of July is, and this time period is to sit back, reflect, honor, these men don't bete them, for mistakes that they made. there's a lot of that. That we like to go back and look in history and criticize their faults, and we all have faults, but they had one thing in common. They believed that we man needed to be free, and that at that point in time, we don't get too, too down the shoot that was all men and don't believe in anything that just because they held slaves, that these men were not fighting for freedom for all men. It was a different time. The England is the one that brought the slaves here. And we put, we the signers Thomas Jefferson, some of the first to, to start putting things in place to end slavery. So fourth July. It's for the independence of all men. And we need to celebrate it. We need to honor it, and we need to always remember these men that put everything on the line for what we have today, and we need to do whatever we can to protect what they started. Thank you. God bless America and just share this podcast. Continue to listen. Do whatever you can. I appreciate it, everything that you do. Thank you and have a great weekend.

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